All posts tagged miata

Understanding the Torque and Horsepower Curves

How does one plot the torque and horsepower curves for a 1999 Miata ? In this blog post, we explain how to do that using some dynamometer or dyno data from someone else’s 99 Miata. I have not taken my Miata to a dyno yet but this should be enough for an example for your car or for any other car, as long as you have the data.

The rest of the data specific to a factory 1999 MX-5 Miata (base trim and 10th Anniversary Edition) can be taken from here, which I provide as miata99_data_power.csv for download and also shown in the table below.

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First Autocross in the Miata

With great trepidation I took the Miata to my local SCCA club autocross event today. I was number 919 in the E-Street class (Figure 1) and ended up chatting with other E-Street racers and their Miata configurations. One of them had upgraded his Base trim 1999 NB Miata to the Performance Package trim by adding all the required Mazda components that would form that trim including a Limited Slip Differential. It is something I might consider in the future.

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Car passed inspection!

The Miata successfully passed inspection today. It took me nearly a year (364 days) since the purchase date to get the inspection done. Changing the O2 sensors was technically easy but I did not have the confidence to do it a year ago. Now I do ! Cannot explain how happy I am today that whatever hard work I have put in to make the car inspection-worthy has worked out well without any serious hiccups.

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Fixing the Parking Brake

The Miata’s hand brake (or e-brake or parking brake) did not keep the car still. The car would move anyway, so I used to keep it in gear when I parked it. It was time to fix the parking brake before I took the car to the DMV for getting the emissions inspection sticker later this week. Fixing the parking brake is quite easy, but it requires removal of the rear wheels.

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Replacing Oxygen Sensors

Since I purchased the Miata it has had a check engine light (CEL) code P0140. One of the solutions among many is to replace the rear Oxygen (O2) sensor in this case. Having experienced bad O2 sensors in my truck in the past and looking at opinions on the web, I decided to replace both the sensors to be safe. My car is a California emissions car and the location of the O2 sensors are different from the rest of the USA (Federal) emissions versions of the same car.

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